Desiigner, Drake and Rihanna made some of 2016's best songs so far.

Alicia Keys, « In Common »

 

I love the idea of the video. Portraying beautiful people who are not considered beautiful by the bigger shallow portion of society.

 

The 1975, « The Sound »

Neon-bright enthusiasm and a tenderly catchy refrain. The steely guitar solo and synth-y build hark back to Eighties New Wave without getting too lost in nostalgia.

Chainz feat. Lil Wayne, « Bounce ».

A complete rarity in the age of emailed guest appearances. Two hip-hop icons take it back to the days of parking lot ciphers and bounce technical, hilarious, highly assonant rhymes off each other – part teamwork and part competition

Animal Collective, « FloriDada ».

 

 

Anohni, « Drone Bomb Me ».

 

Anohni has made one of the year’s most challenging and exhilarating LPs with Hopelessness, using avant-club-pop to explore the dark side of American politics and foreign policy the way others singers might explore doomed romance. On this incredible ballad, she plays a young Afghani girl whose parents have been killed by a U.S. drone strike, praying for the same fate herself like a tragic supplicant.

Courtney Barnett, « Three Packs A Day ».

 

No songwriter around writes with such subtle grace about the pains and pleasures of bohemian life, and here she gives us a casually fleet garage-rock ode to the meager wonders of ramen that turns cheap eating into a class-based cri de coeur: « I’m sick of lentils. »

Beyoncé, « Formation ».

 

 

The centerpiece underdog anthem from Will Toledo’s breakout indie-rock masterpiece Teens of Denial; he builds from glum smeared-sunset prettiness to a heroic chorus that fights through loathing and ambivalence to sweep up the world in a big-riff bear-hug.

Chainsmokers feat. Daya, « Don’t Let Me Down ».

 

EDM may not dominate the charts the way it used to but the Chainsmokers’ swirling, turnt-up love song proves the genre has a little fight left in it. Newcomer Daya goes to battle with the aggro, big room beats and ends up coming out on top.

Chairlift, « Crying In Public ».

 

Crying in front of strangers is the perfect metaphor for the intimacy it takes to open one’s self up to a new person. Indietronic duo Chairlift approach both subjects with sweetness and naivety.

Chance the Rapper feat. 2 Chainz & Lil Wayne, « No Problem ».

 

 

Desiigner, « Panda ».

 

The Future-esque rapping and menacing trap beat that underlies « Panda »‘s ridiculous repetition were already making Internet waves, but a prominent sample on Kanye West’s The Life of Pablo made Desiigner a fixture everywhere from car stereos to Vogue shoots.

Drake, « One Dance ».

 

It finally happened: The tropical, infectious, sung « One Dance » not only extended Drake’s new-world pop sound but also gave the rapper his first Number One solo single.

Fifth Harmony, « Work From Home ».

 

Girl group Fifth Harmony came back equipped with Ty Dolla $ign and a toolbox full of innuendos. Complemented by a simple, DJ Mustard-y beat, the sexy song made everyone want to play hooky.

Flume feat. Kai, « Never Be Like You ».

 

The pop realization of the twisted techno mutations of cutting-edge acts like Flying Lotus, Rustie and Arca. « Never Be Like You » skulks like Timberlake’s « My Love » caught in a parade of sparking, stuttering robotics.

Ariana Grande, « Dangerous Woman ».

 

 

J-Zone, « I’m Sick of Rap ».

 

 

Maxwell, « Lake By the Ocean ».

 

 

Mitski, « Your Best American Girl ».

 

 

Maren Morris, « My Church ».

 

Some keep the Sabbath going to church. Breakout Nashville star Maren Morris keeps it blazing down the freeway listening to classic country radio – with Hank Williams delivering the sermon and Johnny Cash leading the choir. Honoring tradition, this joyous popwise stomper keeps it moving forward.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/pictures/30-best-songs-of-2016-so-far-20160622/parquet-courts-berlin-got-blurry-20160622

Parquet Courts, « Berlin Got Blurry ».

 

The finest American guitar band of the last five years knocks out a woozy, loose-kneed « drunk in Europe » rocker that sounds like the Modern Lovers rocking a spaghetti Western canteen and makes loaded alienation feel warm and cozy.

Radiohead, « Burn the Witch ».

 

 

Rihanna, « Work ».

 

What would even you call a minimalist banger? One of America’s most reliable singles artists created an arch, moody album instead of a handful of chart-ready pop confections, but we still couldn’t resist this barely-there tune with a beat like a dancehall wisp and lyrics like a freestyle.

Paul Simon, « Wristband ».

 

A standout from Simon’s great new Stranger to Stranger: Over an elastic boogaloo groove, Simon sings about an aging rocker accidentally locked out of his own show, embarrassingly battling it out with club security, then pulls back to contrast his small-potatoes gripes with real social and economic struggles. It’s like Larry David by way of Bernie Sanders, the personal-as-political as only Simon can do.

Sturgill Simpson, « In Bloom ».

 

One of country’s most innovative rule-benders takes the bruising Nirvana anthem and finds grim empathy for its gun-toting yahoo protagonist, slowing the original down to a gothy honky-tonk ballad and bringing out new shades of darkness Kurt Cobain would’ve savored.

Kanye West, « Ultralight Beam ».

 

Best case scenario for the next Kanye West song to change the way rap sounds on 2017: a beaming gospel choir, a melody like a blues cry, a Chance the Rapper guest spot and a beat like Minecraft blocks.

White Lung, « Kiss Me When I Bleed ».

 

White Lung’s Mish Way growls out gruesome images of babies born in molasses and rotting teeth above an unsettling, piercing riff that is as stubborn and tenacious as the pride discussed.

Whitney, « Golden Days ».

 

Refugees from the great Chicago garage-rock band Smith Westerns hop a train out to the country, for some elegiac early-Seventies AM-folk bliss – it’s like the America of « Ventura Highway » reborn as a lo-fi stoner guitar nerds, in a good way.

o Gotti feat. Nicki Minaj, « Down in the DM (Remix) »

 

 

 

On paper, a 34-year-old Southern rap lifer talking about his social media game should be embarrassing, but Yo Gotti has the right amount of bounce, humor and R-rated come-ons. Meanwhile, Nicki Minaj shows up to point out who’s really in charge.

Young Greatness, « Moolah ».

 

 

Zayn, « Pillowtalk ».

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publicités

Bon comme un citron bien rond !

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :